CHEF'S CORNER/Meat

MEAT

Cooking meat safely

It's very important to cook meat properly to make sure that any harmful bacteria have been killed. Otherwise you might get food poisoning. Bacteria can be found all the way through certain meat. So this means you need to cook the following sorts of meat until the juices run clear and there is no pink or red left in them:

poultry and game such as chicken, turkey, duck and goose : burgers and sausages : kebabs : rolled joints

But you can eat whole cuts of meat that are still pink inside, as long as they have been properly sealed.

This means you can eat whole cuts of beef and lamb when they are pink or rare. This is because any bacteria are generally on the outside of the meat so if the outside is cooked, this should kill any bacteria, even if the middle of the meat is still pink. These include: steaks : cutlets :joints

Specials : Jacob Sheep
This friendly breed is popular with farmers and farm shops that encourage visitors as the animals have a friendly, inquisitive nature which lends itself well to being near children. The Jacob Sheep can be seen throughout the UK, although the animals in the north and west have four horns while those in the central and southern parts of the UK have only two horns. The full flavoured meat is particularly popular at spring time.
Cooking :
Roast leg or shoulder of lamb

Before you start, calculate the cooking time.
Roast Lamb should be cooked for 20 minutes per pound plus 20 minutes.
Place the Joint in a greased baking tin with a little oil or margarine on top.
Cover with kitchen foil to keep joint moist.
Roast in a pre-heated oven at 200°C; 400°F: Gas 6 for the calculated time.
Remove foil for last 20 minutes to ensure browning.
Pierce with a fork or skewer to test it.
The redder the juices, the rarer the meat.
When ready remove from the oven, rest for 5-10 minutes, carve and serve
Lamb - Chump Chops
The chump comes from the back of the animal, just above the leg. It is a rich meat with loads of flavour and can be cooked quickly to retain its character. It lends itself particularly well to grilling and barbequing.
Marinate your chump chops in powerful spices such as garlic and mint work well, as do jerk flavourings and chilli to compliment the strong lamb flavour . You can also make a dry rub for your chops. When you have chosen your flavours, leave the meat at room temperature while you heat up your barbecue or grill - a griddle pan also works well if the weather is not suited to cooking outdoors. You will only need about 5 minutes each side for a charred outside and slightly pink inside - perfect!
Lamb - Scrag
This cut is from the neck of the animal and is suited to slower cooking. A perfect winter dish is slow cooked lamb scrag - you can dust cubes of meat with seasoned flour and cook in a casserole with plenty of vegetables, potatoes and stock. This also works well with red wine.

Lamb

Specials : Red Poll
The Red Poll is a breed of cattle indigenous to East Anglia. Known as a calm, easy to handle animal, it is gaining popularity for its rich, well marbled meat. Local chefs are raving about the rib eye steaks in particular, with their flavourful strip of fat and tender meat. Currently not generally available throughout the UK, its reputation is restricted to those in the know at present.
Cooking
Roast Beef
Before you start, calculate the cooking time.
Rare beef should be cooked for 15 minutes per pound plus 15 minutes.
Medium beef should be cooked for 20 minutes per pound plus 20 minutes.
Place the joint in a greased baking tin with a little oil or margarine on top.
Cover with kitchen foil to keep joint moist.
Roast in a pre-heated oven at 200°C; 400°F: Gas 6 for the calculated time.
Pierce with a fork or skewer to test it.
The redder the juices, the rarer the meat.
When ready remove from the oven, rest for 5-10 minutes, carve and serve
Beef - Chuck Steak
The chuck steak comes from behind the neck on the animal. A great way to cook it is to make traditional Cornish pasties. Small pieces of chuck steak are placed on a circle of pastry with onions, carrots, Swede and plenty of salt and pepper. Seal and crimp the edges and bake in a hot oven for 20 minutes, turning it down to medium for another 40 minutes.
Beef - Thin Flank
The meat from the back underside of the animal is the flank - this cut is perfect for stir frying and quick cooking. You can make a delicious steak sandwich with onions and tomato relish, or use it for a quick mid week supper. Slice your meat thinly and marinate it with some soy sauce, garlic and chilli. Stir fry with some julienne (thinly sliced) vegetables and spring onions and serve with plain boiled rice or noodles.

Beef

Specials : Gloucestershire Old Spot
This pig breed is rapidly gaining popularity in the UK, especially with the fashion for hog roasts at celebrations and events. The pig is distinctive, with its white coat with a few black spots and heavy drooped ears. As the most expensive British pig, the Gloucestershire Old Spot is widely considered the most 'impressive' breed, so many supermarkets are stocking it, with traceability and locality a key selling point. The breed is kept throughout the UK and makes well flavoured pork and bacon.
Essex Pig
This particular pig breed has gained fame from being featured in a BBC2 series called 'Jimmy's Farm'. The breed was actually classed as extinct in 1967, but a producer who was encouraged to amalgamate the breed with the Wessex Saddleback was committed to maintaining its purity. Now, the Essex Pig breed is loved for its well marbled fat and sweet flavour, making it perfect for bacon and roasting joints.
Cooking
Roast Pork
Before you start, calculate the cooking time.
Roast Pork should be cooked for 20 minutes per pound plus 20 minutes.
Pre-heat the oven to 200°C; 400°F: Gas 6.
Rub the skin with oil and add a pinch of salt.
Place the Joint in a baking tray with a little fat.
Place into the oven.
After 20 minutes cover with tin foil.
Pierce with a fork or skewer to test it.
The juices should run clear with no hint of redness.
Pork must be thoroughly cooked to avoid food poisoning.
When ready remove from the oven, rest for 5-10 minutes,
carve and serve

Pork

Veal is the meat from young calves. It is renowned for having a close texture and is a pale light pink coloured meat with a delicate and subtle flavour. Classic veal dishes tend to originate from Europe and include the Austrian favourite Wiener Schnitzel veal escalope dipped in egg and breadcrumbs, fried in butter and served with lemon. The Italians have many recipes for veal, including Osso Bucco, veal shin cooked with white wine and sprinkled with gremolata (a mixture of chopped parsley, garlic and lemon rind).
Cooking
Quick Roasting - 200C, 400F, Gas mark 6
25 minutes per 450g/1lb plus an extra 25 minutes
Slow Roasting - 180C, 350F, Gas mark 4
35-40 minutes per 450g/1lb plus an extra 35 minutes
NB When using a covered tin or wrapping in foil, increase the cooking time by 15-30 minutes.

 

 

Veal

1/ Scrag 2/ Middle Neck 3/ Best end of Neck 4/ Loin 5/ Chump End
6/ Topside (Silverside or Tp Rump) 7/ Knuckle or Shin
8/ Breast (Flank & Ribs) 9/ Shoulder

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